Online resources

At this time there are many lists appearing that can help you find quality resources to support online learning in your school.  We look for institutions that we know produce reliable and authentic information, and have collated some of them here in this post for ease of access. We will continue to update this as we find new resources to share.

Our wonderful Melbourne Museums have all created online access portals:

Google has developed a comprehensive website providing resources and tools to assist teachers, parents and carers with teaching from home.

A FUSE learning from home page has been established to support school and early childhood leaders, teachers, students, children and parents access digital resources that can be used to support learning at home. Resources include sets of self-directed learning activities that can be provided to students in the form of a Word document or as a printed workbook, and activities parents can do with younger children.

Penguin Random House is permitting teachers, librarians and booksellers to create and share story time and read-aloud videos and live events.

Joyce Valenza is a highly respected commentator in the field of school librarianship. Last week she created a great blog post about learning from home.

The World Digital Library is curated by the Library of Congress in the USA. It includes almost 20,000 items from 193 countries.

The International Children’s Digital Library has over 4600 titles in 59 languages freely available.

Global Storybooks is a free multilingual literacy resource for children and youth worldwide.

Google Arts & Culture features content from over 1200 leading museums and archives who have partnered with the Google Cultural Institute to bring the world’s most famous museums and libraries into your home.

Open Culture brings together high-quality cultural & educational media for the worldwide lifelong learning community.

Audible have made their children’s platform freely available.

Allen & Unwin has a large range of Teachers’ Notes and Teachers’ Tips that are free to download and should provide you with invaluable ideas for teaching and facilitating engaging discussions of individual titles. Teaching resources can be accessed by clicking HERE.

On the Resources page, you will find tabs for Teachers’ Notes (Teachers’ Tips are available in this tab, too), Activities, Catalogues and other useful material. Materials are added according to the date of release of the book, hence more recent titles will be higher up than older. Simply scroll down to find what you are looking for. Alternatively, if you want to see if a particular title has resources available, just type the name of that title in the search bar on the Homepage or click HERE, go to the title’s product page and scroll to the bottom of the page.

Allen and Unwin Guidelines on Virtual Read-Alouds

Teachers or librarians wishing to create virtual read-alouds are permitted to do so at no charge within a closed platform for your use only, for non-commercial use only, and as long as the video is removed after a limited time (30 days) and you acknowledge the author and publisher, Allen & Unwin. Unfortunately, we cannot grant permission for these videos to be posted publicly to YouTube at this time. Please confirm this is agreeable by sending an email HERE with your email address, role, the book you will be reading, and what platform you plan to do the reading on.

Jacaranda have activated a special offer for schools providing remote learning, you can learn more HERE

The Australian Children’s Television Foundation have collated some fantastic resources HERE

CommonSense media also have a brilliant list HERE

ABC Education have some great resources for media literacy studies HERE

This curated list of resources is to assist you to ethically share children’s and young adult literature online.

Mo Willems invites you into his studio every day for his LUNCH DOODLE. Learners worldwide can draw, doodle and explore new ways of writing by visiting Mo’s studio virtually once a day for the next few weeks.

Please continue to share ideas of great sites via our various social media platforms.

ClassAct 50 Task Challenge for digital citizenship

The ClassAct 50 Task Challenge, a digital literacy challenge sponsored by the Office of the Children’s eSafety Commissioner.  ClassAct consists of 50 challenges that schools are encouraged to work through with students to develop a culture of respect and positive interaction in their online and offline worlds and to develop digital citizenship skills.  

How you and your school completes the Challenge is flexible.   The 50 tasks consist of a mix of quick, daily tasks designed to help children take control of their online safety, prompt thinking around respectful relationships and to know where to go to find support if things go wrong.

Each task relates to one or more of the categories:

  1. eSecurity—privacy, protecting personal information
  2. eSafety—managing screen-time, digital footprint, reputation
  3. Help and support
  4. Respect and relationships
  5. Cyberbullying

You may decide to commit to completing one task every day for a whole term, or perhaps to do one a week for a whole year… regardless of how you commit, the intention is to make digital intelligence part of your regular conversation with students to help increase digital safety, reduce negative behaviours like cyberbullying and to make time online as positive and enjoyable as possible.

At the school of the author of this blog, we’re presenting one challenge per school day via the student daily bulletin which is read in homeroom each morning.  The list of challenges are also being shared with parents via the school newsletter.  Not every challenge will appeal to every student but with the support of our student technology team, we’re promoting the ClassAct 50 Task Challenge across our school community, creating conversations and raising awareness.

To give you an idea of the content, here are the first 8 challenges (numbers at the end of each challenge reflect the categories above):

  1. Make a list of all the online accounts you have. Delete those you don’t use. (1,2)
  2. Choose one account that you have and update the password today. (1)
  3. Identify five trusted adults in your world who you would turn to if you had trouble online. (3,4)
  4. Kids Helpline offers webchat counselling. Check out their website to find out what hours it’s available. (3)
  5. Discuss: can you still be lonely if you have lots of friends online? (3, 4)
  6. Take the cyberbullying interactive quiz  (5)
  7. Where can Australian children under the age of 18 go to report cyberbullying? (3, 5)
  8. Research what two factor authentication is. Enable it on at least one of your social media accounts and/or emails. (1)

Plus 42 more….

The Challenge is recommended for students aged 10 – 14 years but is well suited to involving the whole family.

HINT:  I contacted enquiries@esafety.gov.au for an easy to manage .pdf of the 50 challenges.

Social media and reputation preservation!

esafety

This week Victorian media has been alive with the news of AFL (Australian Football League) recruit, Jake Carlisle, shown in a social media video where he appears to be snorting a line of white powder.  Leaked to the general media a day after he’d been signed to a new football club, this video actually came from the footballer’s own mobile phone and was distributed via his own SnapChat account.  A thoughtless action that has exposed his behaviour to the world and tarnished his reputation forever.

This is just one of the incidents our Year 9 Coordinator and I discussed today as we planned a digital citizenship program for Year 9 boys.  It’s essential that students have the opportunity to learn these skills.  To be effective, however, lessons should not be solely instruction or a one-off presentation from a visiting speaker, but should include time for students to have conversations with their peers.  They need time to exchange experiences and to clarify their own held beliefs if the message is to ‘stick’.

Enhancing Online Safety is the new website of the Australian Government – Office of the eSafety Commissioner.  It replaces the very popular ACMA Cyber[Smart] website and includes all the materials from that site.  This is an excellent resource for teaching digital citizenship to students at any year level.  Lesson plans and resources are organised in age-appropriate categories with videos and linked descriptions.

For example, the page Games, apps and social media: quick guide to social media sites and apps has links to 50+ sites popular with young people.  Knowledge and open discussion is easier when backed by quality information and this new site is a wealth of information.  Voluntary teacher certification is also available and will appeal to teachers who wish to build their own skills for teaching a digital citizenship program.

Enhancing Online Safety is a highly recommended resource.  The site is extensive and growing.  I suggest using the site map to support your exploration.  Students need to hear this message often and from many different angles if they are to become responsible in their online communications.  Digital citizenship instruction doesn’t address their behaviour but at least it may give them the chance to save their reputation for the time when they have matured and have their behaviour under control.