National Year of Reading 2012 launch

To celebrate International School Libraries Day on Monday 25 October, the School Library Association of Victoria invites you to join in an Elluminate session at 11.00am (AEDST – check your time zone here) where we will launch the 2012 National Year of Reading. Sue McKerracher will present details of the NYOR and the promotional material that is available for you to use in gaining support and interest at your school.

Click on the NYOR logo to join in the Elluminate session. Celebrate reading and school libraries!

National Year of Reading 2012

This session was recorded and can be accessed here.

SLAV awards – applications closing 17 September

A reminder that applications for the 2010 School Library Association of Victoria awards close on Friday 17 September.

The John Ward Award, The SLAV Research Fellowship, The SLAV Innovator’s Grant and the SLAV School Leaders Award are presented each year. This is a fantastic opportunity to recognise the contributions of a colleague.

The John Ward Award

John Ward was a founding member of SLAV in the early 1960s, a founding member of Australian School Library Association in 1968 and a founding member of the International Association of School Librarianship. He held the positions of Secretary and President of SLAV for many years and was the Secretary of ASLA during the 1970s, a period of rapid library expansion. In recognition of John’s contribution to our profession, the SLAV Council established the John Ward Award in 1998, with a professional development grant of $2000 to be awarded annually.

The recipient/s must demonstrate an outstanding contribution to learning and teaching at their school and raise the profile of the profession through their role as teacher-librarian.


The SLAV Research Fellowship


In recent years education authorities have based curriculum reform on the results of research projects that have been carried out here and overseas.
Academics and practitioners alike have emphasised the need to carry out action research projects and document the impact that our school library programs have on student learning outcomes.

The SLAV Research Fellowship supports research projects that involve school libraries in learning and teaching. The fellowship will take the form of a $1000 grant to provide practical support to a teacher-librarian implementing a local research project.


The SLAV Innovator’s Grant

Sponsored by Pledger Consulting Pty Ltd – Links Plus


In conjunction with Pledger Consulting, SLAV is particularly pleased to sponsor an award that goes to an innovative library or school team. Teams may self nominate or be nominated by SLAV branches.
The grant will consist of a package of SLAV professional development and/or publications to the value of $800 plus $200 worth of Pledger Consulting products. SLAV would like to take this opportunity to thank Pledger Consulting for their generous sponsorship of this award. Over a period of many years Pledger Consulting Pty Ltd has provided directories of internet sites to learners, teacher-librarians and teachers in schools. All of their products are designed to guide research and save time for students, teachers and librarians.

Research has indicated that principal or school leader support of the library program is critical in encouraging teacher / teacher-librarian collaboration and in making the library program an integral part of the learning and teaching of the school. (Colorado Study, 1999)

The SLAV School Leader Award is made to a school leader who demonstrates outstanding support of the school library and the work of the school library team.

The award recipient will be recognised by the presentation of a certificate at the International School Libraries Day Dinner. School leaders can be nominated by a teacher-librarian or the school library team (SLAV membership required to nominate). School personnel who are members of the school leadership team within the school are eligible to be nominated.

SLAV Web Elements Engaged Project

For Victorian Schools only.

Are any of your students and teachers involved in using interesting and innovative online tools?

Have you been working with students and teachers on copyright, creative commons and Intellectual property?

Are you interested in helping your students to build online resources to share their discoveries with others? If you answer YES to any or all of the questions above then the SLAV Web Elements Engaged project might be for you. We need a number of schools to be involved in the development of online video/audio resources to help share knowledge, skills and links that make use of online technologies and help educate others about copyright and IP.

Being part of the project will provide schools with:

  • on-site professional development activities for teachers,
  • some additional equipment and software, and
  • the opportunity for your students to create online resources for other students.

Those involved in the project will also become part of an online community where project resources, ideas and learnings will be shared, discussed and reviewed.

The following are some of the areas we would like to cover as part of the project:

  • Basic Searching Skills
  • Searching skills explored
  • Creative Commons basics
  • Creative Commons – classroom application
  • IP for schools
  • Online Safety
  • Digital Publishing Tools
  • Digital Publishing Responsibilities
  • Google Tools
  • Google Forms
  • Google Docs and Collaboration
  • Google Sites
  • Animoto
  • Wall Wisher
  • Glogster
  • Copyright Free Images
  • Copyright Free Audio/Video
  • Mind Maps
  • ccMixter
  • Evernote
  • Edmodo
  • Prezi
  • Social Bookmarking
  • VoiceThread
  • Avatars
  • Please Note this is not a definitive list and if your school has been working on other areas we would love to hear and see what you have done. If you are interested in being involved please fill out the following online form.

If you are interested in being involved please fill out the following online Expression of Interest Form.

Expressions of Interest close: Monday 13th September 2010
To send any additional information including audio or video clips to show us what you have done, please contact the SLAV office on phone: 9349 5822 or email: slav@netspace.net.au for uploading instructions.

Timeline: Project will run from September 2010 until May 2011.

SLAV 50th anniversary gala dinner

The School Library Association of Victoria will celebrate its 50th anniversary with a Gala Dinner on Thursday, 9 September in the Ballroom at the Rendezvous Hotel. Damian Callinan will be the MC, so it will be a fun opportunity to catch up with colleagues old and new.

The Booking Form is at:
http://www.slav.schools.net.au/downloads/01home/Gala_Dinner_0910.pdf
Please pass this invitation on to your networks. SLAV’s 50th is definitely worth celebrating!

School Library Association of Victoria 50th Anniversary Gala Dinner

Members, former members and supporters are invited to the School Library Association of Victoria, 50th Anniversary Gala Dinner at:

The Ballroom, Rendezvous Hotel, 298 Flinders Street, Melbourne on Thursday 9 September 2010.

Drinks and canapés from 6.45pm.

Cost: $70.00 per guest

A wonderful opportunity to celebrate the history and achievements of your association and share memories and stories with colleagues from across the state.

Booking Form available at:
http://www.slav.schools.net.au/downloads/01home/Gala_Dinner_0910.pdf

2010 SLAV awards

The School Library Association of Victoria are proud to announce their 2010 Awards. The John Ward Award, The SLAV Research Fellowship, The SLAV Innovator’s Grant and the SLAV School Leaders Award are presented each year.  Applications close on Friday 17 September 2010. This is a fantastic opportunity to recognise the contributions of a colleague.

The John Ward Award

John Ward was a founding member of SLAV in the early 1960s, a founding member of Australian School Library Association in 1968 and a founding member of the International Association of School Librarianship.

He held the positions of Secretary and President of SLAV for many years and was the Secretary of ASLA during the 1970s, a period of rapid library expansion.

In recognition of John’s contribution to our profession, the SLAV Council established the John Ward Award in 1998, with a professional development grant of $2000 to be awarded annually.

The recipient/s must demonstrate an outstanding contribution to learning and teaching at their school and raise the profile of the profession through their role as teacher-librarian.


The SLAV Research Fellowship


In recent years education authorities have based curriculum reform on the results of research projects that have been carried out here and overseas.

Academics and practitioners alike have emphasised the need to carry out action research projects and document the impact that our school library programs have on student learning outcomes.

The SLAV Research Fellowship supports research projects that involve school libraries in learning and teaching.
The fellowship will take the form of a $1000 grant to provide practical support to a teacher-librarian implementing a local research project.


The SLAV Innovator’s Grant


Sponsored by Pledger Consulting Pty Ltd – Links Plus


In conjunction with Pledger Consulting, SLAV is particularly pleased to sponsor an award that goes to an innovative library or school team. Teams may self nominate or be nominated by SLAV branches.

The grant will consist of a package of SLAV professional development and/or publications to the value of $800 plus $200 worth of Pledger Consulting products.

SLAV would like to take this opportunity to thank Pledger Consulting for their generous sponsorship of this award. Over a period of many years Pledger Consulting Pty Ltd has provided directories of internet sites to learners, teacher-librarians and teachers in schools. All of their products are designed to guide research and save time for students, teachers and librarians.

The SLAV School Leader Award


Research has indicated that principal or school leader support of the library program is critical in encouraging teacher /
teacher-librarian collaboration and in making the library program an integral part of the learning and teaching of the school. (Colorado Study, 1999)

The SLAV School Leader Award is made to a school leader who demonstrates outstanding support of the school library and the work of the school library team.

The award recipient will be recognised by the presentation of a certificate at the International School Libraries Day Dinner. School leaders can be nominated by a teacher-librarian or the school library team (SLAV membership required to nominate). School personnel who are members of the school leadership team within the school are eligible to be nominated.

Dr Joyce Valenza @ SLAV

On Friday 30th July, hundreds of educators packed the School Library Association of Victoria Make, Share, Do conference held at the Olympic Room at the Melbourne Cricket Ground to hear groundbreaking teacher librarian Dr Joyce Valenza speak about Library 2.0.

Wizard of Apps revised

View more presentations from joycevalenza.
As well as speaking energetically and passionately to two amazing keynote presentations, one of which is above, Dr Valenza was revealed to be a kind, thoughtful and inclusive presenter who made an instant connection with her audience. This conference will not be forgotten quickly and the slideshare above gives us a vast amount of material to pursue for our own school libraries.
Thank you to Tania Sheko who kindly shared her notes from this session. My notes are also available here.

Readers’ Cup blog

The School Library Association of Victoria has developed a blog to support the running of the Readers’ Cup in Victorian schools.

Screen shot 2010-07-08 at 12.24.47 PM

Featuring details of entry, rules and procedures, the blog also has links to a number of questions and answers for books for students in years 5 & 5, 7 & 8 and 9 & 10.

Sponsored by FUSE, the Readers Cup is an excellent way to enthuse students about reading, as this year’s State Final involves students making films about the selected books.

Mooroopna Secondary College Library

Teacher librarian Rachel Fidock, has been involved in an exciting library program at Mooroopna Secondary College. There has been a lot of work put into development of social media and Rachel explains more:

By Rachel Fidock
I am proud to be a member of Mooroopna Secondary Collegeís Library staff consisting of three Teacher-Librarians (myself (Rachel Fidock), Leonie Dyason, and Ruth OíBree) and one Library Technician (Julie Jenkins). In a supportive, professional environment I am able to embrace one of the most important roles of a teacher-librarian ñ providing knowledge of ICT tools that will enhance teaching and learning and provide our students with the ICT skills of multi-literacy, adaptability, discovery, and social networking required in the 21st Century. By incorporating popular Web 2.0 tools in the delivery of library resources, we also increase the level of student interest in the library, their learning, and the building of their knowledge. Programs such as the Personal Learning Network for Victorian Schools (which three of our staff are undertaking), and other professional development opportunities by SLAV, are perfect for this. Not only can I learn about Web 2.0, I am also able to collaborate with like-minded educators.
I began working for MSC in 2007. I have been involved in many exciting library developments. Below are some of these:
Library website:

The library website confirms the importance of the library in the school community by giving it a virtual identity. The website provides many resources for staff and students, including search engine tips, subject weblinks, the library catalogue, and research help.
Subject weblinks: These are created to assist students in their research. The page informs students where to find resources in the library shelves and online, and how to cite an internet page. Most internet sites come from  HYPERLINK “https://fuse.education.vic.gov.au/secondary/pages/Default.aspx” FUSE, and those that do not are suggested to FUSE. The weblinks pages are created in collaboration with teachers. I inform the teacher of the benefits of the weblinks page (i.e. a weblinks page aids in research, provides age appropriate and reliable sites, and is useful for struggling students), and wait for their approval of a draft before it is published on the library website. We inform students of their existence and remind teachers that this resource is available for future assignment topics.
HYPERLINK “https://fuse.education.vic.gov.au/secondary/pages/Default.aspx”FUSE packages:

With the growth of FUSE our subject weblinks are also improving. We have created some resource packages using FUSE which include the subject weblinks page, a note-taking help sheet, a bibliography help sheet, and the assignment cover sheet. Creating resource packages in FUSE allows student access to these resources from home (for those who have the internet), whereas the library website is only accessible via the school intranet. To view one of our packages, have a look at HYPERLINK “http://celebratechange.global2.vic.edu.au/2010/03/21/leonie-dyasons-fuse-presentation/comment-page-1/” \l “comment-20″Leonie Dyasonís FUSE presentation. Again, these packages are created in collaboration with the classroom teacher. The students are given the code to the resource package so they can use it for quick information retrieval.
HYPERLINK “http://libmsc.global2.vic.edu.au/”MSC Library Reviews blog:

This review blog was created to encourage the school community to discuss and share literature experiences and to make a connection between the library and the wider school community. As well as reviews and tips to writing good reviews, there are book trailers created by our library staff, links to the Victorian Premierís Reading Challenge, favourite review sites, author links, and a place for visitors to recommend improvements to the blog and library.
I have advertised the existence of the blog via the daily student bulletin, with requests for any reviews, put notices and reviews in the school newsletter, informally discussed the blog with students, and have signs in the library encouraging contributions to the blog. I am also in the process of putting the subject weblinks on the blog, as another access point for students, with the added bonus that the students have to look at the blog to get to the weblinks. Currently, we are encouraging students to write blog reviews for us and will regularly review our processes and the success of the blog in reaching students.
Book trailers: When I first saw a book trailer I thought that it was such a fantastic way to entice students to read. A book trailer provides the visual stimulation to encourage the further exploration of the storyline. For poor or reluctant readers, it can create the images needed to bring the story to life. We started creating book trailers to show in the library. We can show them on our IWB but think a more central, looping screen might be better. We also decided the review blog is the perfect location to show these trailers. We use only creative commons-licensed pictures on HYPERLINK “http://www.flickr.com/”Flickr, and although we were putting them together using Windows Movie Maker, Julie Jenkins has started using  HYPERLINK “http://animoto.com/” Animoto to really bring the novel to life. You can view the book trailer Julie created for Swerve on our HYPERLINK “http://libmsc.global2.vic.edu.au/”  review blog now.
Google Earth and HYPERLINK “http://www.googlelittrips.com/GoogleLit/Home.html”Google Lit Trips:

Google Earth provides a tool for students to present oral presentations on their novels (where appropriate (i.e. aspects of the book can be highlighted by Google Earth)). We have low VELS levels in Speaking and Listening, possibly because students are not at ease giving oral presentations (often the way they are assessed for Speaking and Listening). Google Earth†helps students to†divert the attention from themselves. For example, they can show the class a trip they create that follows the journey taken by the main†character in the novel (e.g. Swerve by Phillip Gwynne). There are options to add images (creative commons-licensed images from Flickr), or show pictures that are already on Google Earth. There are so many options in Google Earth that students can make it as in-depth as they wish. The best part is they can record their voice over their journey so they have another option of meeting the requirements of Speaking and Listening. I have put together a guide to using Google Earth for the English staff that highlights how a Google Lit Trip can be used as an alternate assessment item for students to meet the requirements of VELS levels in Speaking and Listening, and created a Google Lit Trip on the novel Swerve as an example of its use.
We are now in the Ultranet training stage and are looking for ways the Library services, particularly our website, can become part of the studentís virtual space.
I am proud to be a member of Mooroopna Secondary College’s Library staff consisting of three Teacher-Librarians (myself, Leonie Dyason, and Ruth O’Bree) and one Library Technician (Julie Jenkins). In a supportive, professional environment I am able to embrace one of the most important roles of a teacher-librarian – providing knowledge of ICT tools that will enhance teaching and learning and provide our students with the ICT skills of multi-literacy, adaptability, discovery, and social networking required in the 21st Century. By incorporating popular Web 2.0 tools in the delivery of library resources, we also increase the level of student interest in the library, their learning, and the building of their knowledge. Programs such as the Personal Learning Network for Victorian Schools (which three of our staff are undertaking), and other professional development opportunities by SLAV, are perfect for this. Not only can I learn about Web 2.0, I am also able to collaborate with like-minded educators.
I began working for MSC in 2007. I have been involved in many exciting library developments. Below are some of these:
Library website

Library website

The library website confirms the importance of the library in the school community by giving it a virtual identity. The website provides many resources for staff and students, including search engine tips, subject weblinks, the library catalogue, and research help.
Subject weblinks: These are created to assist students in their research. The page informs students where to find resources in the library shelves and online, and how to cite an internet page. Most internet sites come from FUSE, and those that do not are suggested to FUSE. The weblinks pages are created in collaboration with teachers. I inform the teacher of the benefits of the weblinks page (i.e. a weblinks page aids in research, provides age appropriate and reliable sites, and is useful for struggling students), and wait for their approval of a draft before it is published on the library website. We inform students of their existence and remind teachers that this resource is available for future assignment topics.
FUSE packages:
Mooroopna 2
With the growth of FUSE our subject weblinks are also improving. We have created some resource packages using FUSE which include the subject weblinks page, a note-taking help sheet, a bibliography help sheet, and the assignment cover sheet. Creating resource packages in FUSE allows student access to these resources from home (for those who have the internet), whereas the library website is only accessible via the school intranet. To view all of our packages, have a look at Leonie Dyason’s FUSE presentation. Again, these packages are created in collaboration with the classroom teacher. The students are given the code to the resource package so they can use it for quick information retrieval.
MSC Library Reviews blog:
Mooroopna 3
This review blog was created to encourage the school community to discuss and share literature experiences and to make a connection between the library and the wider school community. As well as reviews and tips to writing good reviews, there are book trailers created by our library staff, links to the Victorian Premier’s Reading Challenge, favourite review sites, author links, and a place for visitors to recommend improvements to the blog and library.
I have advertised the existence of the blog via the daily student bulletin, with requests for any reviews, put notices and reviews in the school newsletter, informally discussed the blog with students, and have signs in the library encouraging contributions to the blog. I am also in the process of putting the subject weblinks on the blog, as another access point for students, with the added bonus that the students have to look at the blog to get to the weblinks. Currently, we are encouraging students to write blog reviews for us and will regularly review our processes and the success of the blog in reaching students.
Book trailers: When I first saw a book trailer I thought that it was such a fantastic way to entice students to read. A book trailer provides the visual stimulation to encourage the further exploration of the storyline. For poor or reluctant readers, it can create the images needed to bring the story to life. We started creating book trailers to show in the library. We can show them on our IWB but think a more central, looping screen might be better. We also decided the review blog is the perfect location to show these trailers. We use only creative commons-licensed pictures on Flickr, and although we were putting them together using Windows Movie Maker, Julie Jenkins has started using Animoto to really bring the novel to life. You can view the book trailer Julie created for Swerve on our review blog now.
Thanks to Rachel for sharing all of the amazing things she and the other members of the MSC library team have developed. There is just so much to inspire and many ideas for readers.