SLAV Online Book Club Wednesday May 18th 2022 – Humour

Our thanks to those of you able to join us for yesterday’s book club meeting to share your favourite Humour picks. We all love a good laugh, but we don’t all share the same views about what is funny in fiction.  What books work best with your readers? As always, so many of you had so many wonderful contributions to share with us, and it is very appreciated.

This was our third book club meeting for 2022, and we look forward to chatting with you again at our next Online Book Club discussion on June 16th  to discuss the topic: Non- Fiction for pleasure. Books that present factual information for pleasure have become more sophisticated with high production and design values adding to the pleasurable reading experience. What texts are always off the shelves in your library?

Disclaimer: The lists generated as a result of Book Club discussions are not, by any means, an exhaustive list of all titles or authors for each genre/category discussed. Nor will all titles be suitable for all libraries. We advise staff discretion when referencing these lists, to properly confirm individual title suitability for individual libraries, school and students needs. These are suggested titles only, shared by our members and inclusion on, or exclusion from, a list does not suggest SLAV endorsement or rejection of a title.

Books Discussed/Attendee suggestions

Young Adult

That Thing I Did by Allayne L. Webster

Heartstopper by Alice Oseman

Louise Rennison Series (possibly a bit dated)

The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy Series by Douglas Adams

Junior/Upper Primary Fiction

David Walliams Series

My Life as an Alphabet by Barry Jonsberg

The Wimpy Kid Series by Jeff Kinney

Paul Jennings – Unseen, Unbearable, Uncanny, Uncovered

The Sad Ghost Club by Lize Meddings

The Weirdo series by Anh Do

The Wednesday Weeks series by Cristy Burne & Denis Knight

Skullduggery Pleasant series by Derek Landy

Matt Larkin titles – The Orchard Underground and The Chameleon Thief

Captain Underpants by Dav Pilkey

Dog Man by Dav Pilkey

Funny Stories for 8 year Old’s by Helen Paiba

Malory Towers – Enid Blyton (BBC series)

The World of Norm by Jonathan Meres

What’s New Harper Drew by Kathy Weeks

The Little Brute Family by Russell Hoban

Picture Books

Backyard Birdies by Geppert (non-fiction)

The Story of the Little Mole Who Knew It was None of His Business by by Werner Holzwarth and Wolf Erlbruch

The Wonky Donkey by Craig Smith

Tyes Picks – SLAV Book Club May 18th 2022 – Humour.

Young Adult

Wayward Son by Rainbow Rowell https://www.readings.com.au/products/27633528/wayward-son

It’s Not You, It’s Me by Gabrielle Williams https://www.readings.com.au/products/33725018/its-not-you-its-me

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzie Lee https://www.readings.com.au/products/23546046/the-gentlemans-guide-to-vice-and-virtue

The First Third by Will Kostakis https://www.readings.com.au/products/17240619/the-first-third

Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy https://www.readings.com.au/products/19460247/dumplin

Good Omens by Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett https://www.readings.com.au/products/26868214/good-omens

Stardust by Neil Gaiman https://www.readings.com.au/products/5124406/stardust

Junior Fiction

The Naughtiest Unicorn Bumper Collection by Pip Bird https://www.readings.com.au/products/33210346/the-naughtiest-unicorn-bumper-collection

Marge in Charge by Eglantine Ceulemans, Isla Fisher https://www.readings.com.au/products/21975952/marge-in-charge

Fortunately, the Milk . . . by Neil Gaiman, Chris Riddell https://www.readings.com.au/products/31346500/fortunately-the-milk

Skunk and Badger (Skunk and Badger, Book 1) by Amy Timberlake, Jon Klassen https://www.readings.com.au/products/32916785/skunk-and-badger-skunk-and-badger-book-1

The Last Kids on Earth by Max Brallier, Douglas Holgate https://www.readings.com.au/products/27266334/the-last-kids-on-earth

Look into my eyes by Lauren Child (Ruby Redfort) https://www.readings.com.au/products/14670542/look-into-my-eyes

The Bolds by Julian Clary https://www.readings.com.au/products/19410936/the-bolds

Flora & Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo, K.G. Campbell https://www.readings.com.au/products/21735595/flora-and-ulysses

Hilda and the Hidden People by Luke Pearson, Stephen Davies, Seaerra Miller https://www.readings.com.au/products/26846991/hilda-and-the-hidden-people

Mr. and Mrs. Bunny–Detectives Extraordinaire! By Polly Horvath, Sophie Blackall https://www.readings.com.au/products/17513683/mr-and-mrs-bunny-detectives-extraordinaire

Jefferson by Jean-Claude Mourlevat, Ros Schwartz https://www.readings.com.au/products/32659486/jefferson

Mat Larkin https://srchy.readings.com.au/results?query=Mat%20Larkin

The Wee Free Men: A Tiffany Aching Novel by Terry Pratchett, Laura Ellen Andersen https://www.readings.com.au/products/23772770/the-wee-free-men-a-tiffany-aching-novel

 Picture Books

Who Wet My Pants? By Bob Shea, Zachariah OHora https://www.readings.com.au/products/27502393/who-wet-my-pants

Going to the Volcano by Andy Stanton, Miguel Ordonez https://www.readings.com.au/products/26360624/going-to-the-volcano

Super Happy Magic Forest by Matty Long https://www.readings.com.au/products/19858036/super-happy-magic-forest

I Just Ate My Friend by Heidi McKinnon https://www.readings.com.au/products/30361565/i-just-ate-my-friend

I’ll Wait, Mr Panda by Steve Antony https://www.readings.com.au/products/21441628/ill-wait-mr-panda

Miss Understood by KATHRYN APEL, Beau Wylie https://www.readings.com.au/products/35003178/miss-understood

Pokko and the Drum by Matthew Forsythe https://www.readings.com.au/products/27630367/pokko-and-the-drum

Graphic Novel

Garlic and the Vampire by Bree Paulsen https://www.readings.com.au/products/33759137/garlic-and-the-vampire

Adult Books Discussed 

The Nancys by R.W.R. McDonald

Hanya Yanagihara – all

The Gilded Years by Karin Tanabe

Hannah Gadsby’s biography – Ten Steps to Nanette

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guest Blog Post – SLAV Spotlight On Series

SLAV Spotlight On Sessions

Over the past couple of months I have had the pleasure of completing a virtual placement with SLAV as I near the end of my studies in librarianship at CSU. A major part of the placement included my attendance and participation in a variety of professional development sessions and events offered by SLAV. One of these sessions—and possibly the most influential and impactful, were the Spotlight On Sessions.

These sessions featured three guest teacher-librarians, who gave virtual tours of their respective libraries. We heard about a number of programs including ‘Summer Reading Challenges’ and innovative online/web-based programs to support such challenges, as well as forward-thinking initiatives to support digital literacy and future-ready skills for students. Guests shared information about some of the ways wide reading is supported within their schools, how teacher-librarians build and maintain relationships with teaching staff, and how the use of LibGuides can be maximised to support educational outcomes for students.

It was nothing short of inspiring to hear from librarians who are continually striving to develop best practices to support their students and colleagues in an environment that like many others, has had to pivot and embrace the online space due to Covid-19 and associated challenges. After attending the Spotlight On sessions, what became clear to me was that this kind of professional learning allows one to get an intimate glimpse of how colleagues within the profession continually strive for excellence in their respective roles. In turn, this exchange of ideas can help us to constantly adapt and grow as information professionals, whilst also ensuring the best possible outcomes for the communities in which we serve.

 – Vanessa Carnevale – From 2022 Community Hub Manager – Plenty Valley Christian College

Slow Reading: the Power to Transform

IMG_5232a

Reading programs and the support of a culture of reading is a common commitment in school libraries.  As teacher librarians, and librarians, we promote reading for enjoyment as a means of raising literacy levels through activities such as reading classes; engaging children in the Premiers’ Reading Challenge; running Book Clubs or supporting English teachers. To this end, the Synergy article Slow Reading: The Power to Transform by Dr Pam Macintyre, Senior Lecturer in Portfolio of Design and Social Context in the School of Education at RMIT is of particular interest.

In this article Pam says it’s logical to state, ‘greater understanding produces greater pleasure when reading’.  To fully understand and learn the skill of reading she encourages us to take time and to give students time, through a process of ‘slow reading’ saying:

Students need us to slow the reading, to model and facilitate the enjoyment of contemplation and the sharing of responses and interpretations. We need to share our enjoyment of language, and the delight in the places reading can take us well beyond the physical, geographical, emotional, intellectual boundaries of our daily lives. We also need to share our knowledge and pleasure about the how of what is said, not only the what.

Pam mentions the Australian research, the Children and Reading literature review which reports a 4% drop in the number of children reading for pleasure between 2003 and 2012.  As a passionate advocate of adolescent reading, she notes the opportunities for further research in this field as reading formats change from hard copy to digital.

In promoting a reading culture Pam quotes Terry Eagleton’s, How to Read Literature (2013)  and urges us to encourage in students a peculiarly vigilant type of reading, ‘one which is alert to tone, mood, pace, genre, syntax, grammar, texture, rhythm, narrative structure, punctuation, ambiguity’ (2013, p. 2).

This article, published in SLAV’s professional journal Synergy, provides teacher librarians and educators involved in raising literacy levels through a formal reading program, with a thoughtful approach to developing skilled readers.  Synergy is published bi-annually and is freely accessible online, apart from the two most recent editions.  It is a valuable source of research relating to school libraries.

Partipation through a Virtual Learning Commons

virtual-learning-commons

Delegates at the School Library Association of Victoria Conference last Friday, 8 August, designed and imagined possibilities for the creation of a virtual learning commons that encourages participation by the whole school community.

Lead by Dr David Loertscher and Carol Koechlin, the conference theme Virtual Learning Commons: Building a Participatory School Culture recognises that the school library has a new role. The physical space must change.  It must be flexible – ‘if it doesn’t move it doesn’t belong in the school library’. The book collection needs to be fresh and inviting and the learning situation should control the space.  Furthermore, a well planned and developed virtual library space can be a place of involvement for the school community.

Thanks to delegates who tweeted with #slavconf. This Storify is a compilation of those tweets providing an overview of the conference and resources shared.

What’s Technology For, Anyway?

In this guest post, Kristin Fontichiaro, Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan, School of Information highlights key ideas from her upcoming presentation at SLAV’s, Transliteracy, multiliteracy, makerspaces: how can I participate? on Friday, 16th August.

The other day, I heard a story. A parent of young children heard that the oldest children in the school – ages 9 and 10 – were going to be having an end-of-year technology celebration to which everyone in the building was invited.  Eager to hear what her kids would be experiencing in a few years, she dropped by. The students filed in front of the assembly and, without a word, held up an A4  printout of a presentation slide.

That was it.

The whole school had been pulled out of class to gaze at small pieces of paper dozens of feet away.

Ahem.

Now, I have no doubt that the educators behind that project had great intentions and worked hard. (Anyone who has ever tried to get an entire primary school class to print out a project without mixing up whose is whose knows what a feat it is that each kid actually ended up with anything.)

But how did a tool meant to serve as an illuminated backdrop for public speaking end up as a small paper rectangle held up by a silent child? How did a faculty make a decision that seeing these faraway papers merited pulling every other child out of class? What was this project supposed to accomplish?

It’s hard to know. Maybe the technology curriculum focuses on the acquisition of specific skills and behaviours (“the learner will print from software,” “the learner will format a presentation slide”). Maybe the educators were pressed for time. Maybe something else.

I would argue that the crux of the issue is this: there were not clear, aspirational expectations for how technology could transform, extend, and deepen student learning. I would bet that this faculty did not have a clear understanding of what it meant to teach and learn with technology and how to use technology as a game-changer. I have a hunch that the administration pushed for its staff to use technology without talking about how and why to use it.

I quote an extreme example, but (I fear) it probably resonated within the realm of possibility for you. In this madcap Web 2.0 world, where there are endless “creative” tools, just waiting for you to type in a few words and pick a template, how do we move the conversation from “teachers need to use technology, period,” to, “technology needs to transform the teaching and learning and take students further than they could go without technology.”

Next Friday, we’ll gather to talk about this phenomenon. We’ll look at a possible vocabulary and framework for planning and discussing student work, and we’ll draw inspiration from Alan Liu’s Transliteracies Project as we collaborate to articulate what it means to do robust “reading” and “writing” in multimedia. At the end of the day, we’ll dip quickly into two alternative ways to use technology with kids: digital badging to track learning in formal and informal spaces and the makerspace movement. Come roll up your sleeves and dig in with us!

Image credit : cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo shared by Brad Flickinger

Getting ready for Resource Description and Access (RDA)

In the next issue of FYI Renate Beilharz explains all about RDA and the implications for school libraries. FYI editor Yso Ferguson gives us an outline of some of the resources and tips mentioned in Renate’s article.

Resource Description and Access (RDA) is a new standard of library cataloguing that is designed for the digital world. The RDA toolkit website describes the benefits of RDA as:

  • A structure based on the conceptual models of FRBR (functional requirements for bibliographic data) and FRAD (functional requirements for authority data) to help catalog users find the information they need more easily
  • A flexible framework for content description of digital resources that also serves the needs of libraries organizing traditional resources
  • A better fit with emerging database technologies, enabling institutions to introduce efficiencies in data capture and storage retrievals

In the next issue of FYI Renate Beilharz offers some tips for coming to grips with Resource Description and Access. The speed of the implementation depends on many factors. Important among these are:

  • What Library Management System (LMS) your library uses
  • Where your library’s cataloguing information comes from – it might be from SCIS or Libraries Australia or it might be original cataloguing

The main pieces of  advice to take away are:

  • You don’t need to panic as RDA and AACR records are compatible so you won’t have to retrospectively catalogue all old records. Expect to have both sorts of records in your catalogue for a long time.
  • For a general overview of what RDA record look like have a look at the RDA toolkit examples.
  • If you copy catalogue, you will need to find out what your record provider is doing about the introduction of RDA.
  • For schools using SCIS, RDA records will be introduced in May/June of this year.
  • More detailed information and explanation can be found by going to the SCIS blog
  • For schools using Libraries Australia , RDA records will begin in April 2013.
  • You can find out more by visiting the NLA’s Update on RDA implementation and Description of RDA
  • It is also a good idea to talk to your LMS provider to find out what they are doing to implement RDA.
  • Think about doing some training. There are various options. SLAV sponsored workshops will run in May and June. A list of commercial enterprises can be found through the Australian Committee on Cataloguing.
  •  Box Hill Institute is running some short courses. Search for Library Studies on their site.
  • You could also have a look some of the free online training materials such as the Australian Committee on Cataloguing (National Library of Australia), RDA Toolkit  & Library of Congress
  • Want to get started? Get the free 30 day trial, from the RDA Toolkit.

 

Be in control: participate in the new age of school libraries

Cindy Tschernitz, Executive Officer from SLAV, introduces the second SLAV conference for 2013.

Be in control: participate in the new age of school libraries is the second School Library Association of Victoria (SLAV) conference for 2013.  The conference for library team members will be held on Friday the 24th of  May, 2013 at the Melbourne Park Function Centre.

Continuing with the 2013 SLAV theme of “Participate, engage, shine – you, me, us” this conference highlights everyone’s role as a team member and recognises that teams win the game, not individuals. Whatever your role, whether selector, coach, captain, player, runner, medic or supporter, you  all contribute to team success.

We will examine:

  • what a school library is in the 21st century, the role of the individual in school library teams and how you can be in charge of your own development.
  • What type of professional fitness are we building for ourselves through our own personal training?
  • What strategies have we adopted in the new age of school libraries in accessing new resources and exploring different ways of operating and contributing to the school library team within the context of the Australian Curriculum?

Participate, engage and discover.  Where you will shine in the premiership winning school library team?

Registrations are now open. Download the Brochure and Registration form and email slav@netspace.net.au or fax  03 9349 4437

Thanks to Cindy for sharing details of the interesting program. Remember you can follow all SLAV conferences on Twitter using the #slavconf hashtag.

 

Participate, engage, shine – Professional learning in 2013

Cindy Tschernitz, Executive Officer of the School Library Association of Victoria, explores the theme of professional learning events from SLAV in 2013 and introduces the first conference of the year.

Learning has become a participatory process in schools. In recent years many have joined online professional learning networks developed through the partnership of the SLAV and SLV to grow their experience and knowledge within a worldwide context. The opportunities are limitless, it is all about participating. This year we look forward to exploring the multiple information sources required for transliteracy; research skills in the national curriculum; the integration of technology into learning, changing library spaces and reading in a digital age. With the theme ‘Participate, Engage, Shine’ we look forward to another exciting year of learning in 2013.

New technologies, a diversity of resource formats and a continuous journey of learning have become familiar landscape for school library staff. In 2013 school libraries are in a transformative period. The accelerating changes of the Australian Curriculum and AITSL national professional standards for teachers is changing the education landscape and as a consequence the role of the library. It is both an exciting and challenging time. Overwhelmingly, it is a time to participate, engage and shine to ensure success for both yourself and your students.

With this in mind the first SLAV Conference of the year will explore the world of opportunities available for teacher-librarians and school leaders. Professor Tara Brabazon, the newly appointed Professor of Education and Head of the School of Teacher Education at Charles Sturt University (CSU),  will lead the day with a provocative keynote “Note to Self: Note taking and the control of information” that will challenge our thoughts on student learning. Patricia Cowling, Principal Genazzano FCJ College and the 2012 SLAV School Leaders Award Winner will present the closing address, “A Principal’s View of school libraries”.

In between we will examine new professional and cataloguing standards. Dr Graeme Hall and Ms Emma Scott will look at AITSL standards and how they will impact on teacher-librarians and Renate Beilharz will introduce us to the new cataloguing standards RDA/FRBR and the impact of the semantic web.

The afternoon brings us three dynamic concurrent sessions facilitated by practitioners. Attend a workshop on getting ready for RDA, learn about how to best use new library systems and how they enhance learning outcomes or look at different models for data gathering and analysis.

So join us and “Participate, Engage and Shine” at the first conference for 2013.

Event details:

School Libraries a new frontier – a world of opportunities: a conference for teacher-librarians and school leaders

School Library Association of Victoria Conference, Friday 15 March 2013, Etihad Stadium, Docklands

Download the conference program

Download the conference registration form

 

Leading the reinvention of learning

The SLAV Global eLiteracy conference was held last Friday, 27th of July.  The conference explored the changing face of learning in a digital age.

The event was significant as it saw the announcement by Judy O’Connell of oztlnet.com, a new site for the Australian Teacher Librarian Network. You can become involved with OZTL through  Facebook, Twitter or the Diigo group.
Global eliteracy conferences

The day involved a number of interesting presentations, but the highlight was the round table session. Delegates spent time in small groups learning from peer leaders about a range of technologies. There was a wonderful atmosphere of collegial support, exploration and sharing.

You can find notes from the event as they are added here and also see a summary, including highlights from a very active Twitter stream, at this Storify of the day.

Congratulations to all of the organisers for a very successful day of professional learning.

i.Read

Susan Mapleson, a Teacher Librarian at Christian College (Senior Campus) Geelong has developed a very funky blog for lovers of literature. The i.Read blog is cleverly titled and has been developing nicely throughout the year.

Screen shot 2010-12-05 at 12.18.33 PM

Susan explains how the blog came about:

I completed the SLAV PLN program earlier in the year and while this is not the blog I started during the PLN program is it the more meaningful and relevant blog I started along with Deb Canaway (the other Teacher Librarian here at the senior campus) during the year and includes many of the tools I learnt doing the program.

We started our blog for the students and teachers at Christian College Senior school and while we have not been overwhelmed with responses, certainly we have had many people access our blog.

It was aimed mainly at our Year 10 English classes who come to the Library usually at the beginning and end of the  term to borrow books. It was another way to interact with the students, promote the Library and recommend books to students as we only review books we have in the Library. Year 10 students had to write a book review as part of their English curriculum and also submit a brief version onto the blog. The positive of this task was that the students got a real buzz out of seeing their reviews online and for many it was the first time they had read and or contributed to a blog.

In the future we would like to have our staff also contribute to the blog and find more ways to encourage students to leave comments.

Congratulations Sue and Deb for creating a vibrant and attractive blog. Now that the blog has a good body of work, it will be easier to promote it in the new year.