Online resources

At this time there are many lists appearing that can help you find quality resources to support online learning in your school.  We look for institutions that we know produce reliable and authentic information, and have collated some of them here in this post for ease of access. We will continue to update this as we find new resources to share.

Our wonderful Melbourne Museums have all created online access portals:

Google has developed a comprehensive website providing resources and tools to assist teachers, parents and carers with teaching from home.

A FUSE learning from home page has been established to support school and early childhood leaders, teachers, students, children and parents access digital resources that can be used to support learning at home. Resources include sets of self-directed learning activities that can be provided to students in the form of a Word document or as a printed workbook, and activities parents can do with younger children.

Penguin Random House is permitting teachers, librarians and booksellers to create and share story time and read-aloud videos and live events.

Joyce Valenza is a highly respected commentator in the field of school librarianship. Last week she created a great blog post about learning from home.

The World Digital Library is curated by the Library of Congress in the USA. It includes almost 20,000 items from 193 countries.

The International Children’s Digital Library has over 4600 titles in 59 languages freely available.

Global Storybooks is a free multilingual literacy resource for children and youth worldwide.

Google Arts & Culture features content from over 1200 leading museums and archives who have partnered with the Google Cultural Institute to bring the world’s most famous museums and libraries into your home.

Open Culture brings together high-quality cultural & educational media for the worldwide lifelong learning community.

Audible have made their children’s platform freely available.

Allen & Unwin has a large range of Teachers’ Notes and Teachers’ Tips that are free to download and should provide you with invaluable ideas for teaching and facilitating engaging discussions of individual titles. Teaching resources can be accessed by clicking HERE.

On the Resources page, you will find tabs for Teachers’ Notes (Teachers’ Tips are available in this tab, too), Activities, Catalogues and other useful material. Materials are added according to the date of release of the book, hence more recent titles will be higher up than older. Simply scroll down to find what you are looking for. Alternatively, if you want to see if a particular title has resources available, just type the name of that title in the search bar on the Homepage or click HERE, go to the title’s product page and scroll to the bottom of the page.

Allen and Unwin Guidelines on Virtual Read-Alouds

Teachers or librarians wishing to create virtual read-alouds are permitted to do so at no charge within a closed platform for your use only, for non-commercial use only, and as long as the video is removed after a limited time (30 days) and you acknowledge the author and publisher, Allen & Unwin. Unfortunately, we cannot grant permission for these videos to be posted publicly to YouTube at this time. Please confirm this is agreeable by sending an email HERE with your email address, role, the book you will be reading, and what platform you plan to do the reading on.

Jacaranda have activated a special offer for schools providing remote learning, you can learn more HERE

The Australian Children’s Television Foundation have collated some fantastic resources HERE

CommonSense media also have a brilliant list HERE

ABC Education have some great resources for media literacy studies HERE

This curated list of resources is to assist you to ethically share children’s and young adult literature online.

Mo Willems invites you into his studio every day for his LUNCH DOODLE. Learners worldwide can draw, doodle and explore new ways of writing by visiting Mo’s studio virtually once a day for the next few weeks.

Please continue to share ideas of great sites via our various social media platforms.

Professional Learning Resource Round Up

As we all respond to the directives and guidelines in relation to COVID – 19 our association is working hard to ensure we are doing all we can to support our members.

With some schools needing to close for indefinite periods of time there may be a need for your school library staff to indicate ways they are exploring professional learning during a period of school closure or changed operations.

To assist, we have created this post, listing a range of professional learning opportunities made available to members.

A range of presentations from past Professional Learning Events can be accessed via the SLAV Member Login page HERE.

Over the past two years we have created podcasts of all of our Reading Forum events as well recording a selection of presentations given at our major conferences. These podcasts are available to anyone online and can be accessed HERE.

Synergy is our online, research based, journal. The most recent edition of the journal is closed to members only but all other editions of the journal are made freely available in light of the Associations interest in being collegiate and supportive of the wider professional community. We encourage you to explore the wealth of information from current and past editions HERE. 

Digital issues of our publication – FYI – can be accessed HERE. 

As a SLAV member, you also have access to resources from the International Association of School Librarianship through our partner membership status. There are some wonderful resources to be accessed on the IASL website and we encourage you to find time to explore them. Login details are available on our Member Login page.

Finally, a word on our 2020 Professional Learning Calendar. As we advised in our most recent newsletter we are doing all we can to ensure we are keeping our members and presenters safe, and are responding to guidelines and directives accordingly.

Events – cancellations and postponements

Our March 23 conference has been cancelled.

The IB workshop to be held in conjunction with DATTA Vic at Kardinia College on April 16 has been cancelled.

Our May Masterclass in conjunction with LMERC – Powering Learning: Supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives has been moved to September 4.

Our May 29 Conference – School Libraries: Powering Primary has been moved to September 14.

The National Education Summit on August 28 and 29 at MCEC, a strand of which we are a partner in providing, has been postponed to a later date yet to be announced.

All other Reading Forums, Workshops and Masterclasses

The remainder of our program are events that are to be held in school venues. At present we are continuing to plan and offer these events on the understanding that a decision will be made a month to two weeks out from each as to whether they are to go ahead. As it is very difficult to know exactly where we will be in two months’ time this approach is hopefully the best response in unknown times.

If you have any queries about this, please contact the SLAV office on 0477 439 593 or email slav@slav.org.au

We encourage all members to stay in touch with each other in these challenging times. Our branch structure is an excellent source of local support.  We encourage you to reach out and offer collegiate advice wherever you can and to ask if you need help or assistance. Our social media platforms can also be a source of connection. Please do reach out, we are open to assisting you in any way we can.

Reading forum series – podcast

The third of four SLAV Reading Forums planned for 2018 was held 6 September at Kew Primary School.

These events are proving to be very popular with school library staff, teachers and parents.  This month’s program featured a panel discussion on the topic of genrefication of the school library collection (particularly fiction) by local library professionals.  Authors David Metzenthen and Michael Wagner were feature authors on the evening and Kids Bookshop presented ‘Ten top books in ten minutes’.

If you missed the evening, or would like to recap, we’re pleased to advise the podcast of the event is now available for downloading on Soundcloud.  Previous forums are also available for download.

Further information on genrefication is available in the member’s portal of the SLAV website via conference presentations and articles in the journal FYI. The article Genre Labelling by Melanie Mengel is available on open access through SLAV’s professional publication Synergy.

The final Reading Forum for 2018 will be held:

Date:  1 November
Venue:  The Dream Factory, 90 Maribyrnong Street, Footscray
Topic: Current Reading Research

  • Recent reading research from here and overseas. Join the discussion and the
    end of year celebratory vibe
  • New books to share
  • Guest author
  • The Kids’ Bookshop in attendance
  • Register Online

 

 

 

Brand new, refurbished or still planning! – New school libraries


To be confident in having a say in the planning and design of your new or refurbished school library you need to be informed.  To this end, SLAV is once again providing an opportunity to explore the possibilities and share experiences with a conference devoted to exploring creative options for library spaces and offering inspiration and ideas that can be replicated and reinvented in any school library context, regardless of budget.

To be held at Victoria University in Flinders St, Melbourne on Friday 17 August, Real Libraries: Collaborative Spaces will take inspiration from library designer Kevin Hennah and the practical experience of a range of school library practitioners who have ‘walked the walk’.   Many schools have revitalised their libraries in recent times, with many more still in the planning.  School libraries are flexible, collaborative and stimulating spaces and this conference program will inspire practitioners with tools, evidence and examples of ways to reinvent and grow the possibilities that are offered by a vibrant school library.

We will also hear of the bold Vision 2020 plans of State Library of Victoria and their project to transform into a modern, responsive centre of learning and innovation.   The way we use our libraries has changed for the better in recent years and there is much to share about the experience.  Yes, they’re about reading and learning…. but also so much more.   This conference will be an opportunity to learn. Registration details.

 

 

Real libraries vs Fake News – SLAV Conference

School Library Assoc of Vic commenced 2018 by welcoming Dr Susan La Marca to the helm as Executive Officer of the Association. Susan, a well known and respected member of the school library community both within Australia and internationally, has led the planning and exciting year of learning for members and school library colleagues.

The year started strongly with a focus on the role of school libraries in this time of information complexity.  The  conference Real Libraries vs Fake News. held 23 March at Victoria University Conference Centre featured Dr Barbara Combes – Charles Sturt University; Misha Ketchell, Managing Editor The Conversation; Jo Teng, Australian Copyright Council together with a range of workshops.   Highlights of the Twitter conversation have been captured below.

Be informed! Briefly, details of upcoming events and registration are accessible on the SLAV website, in particular:

In this Storify file are posts from SLAVConnects colleagues tweeting from the conference under the hashtag #slavconf. Explore them for valuable resources and highlights of the day.

SLAV is passionate about the role of school library staff, educators and parents as elements in student literacy development.  SLAV Conferences are designed to suit all educators and parents interested in K12 learning.  If you are interested in attending an event, please get in touch and come along.  All welcome.

Citizen Science – involving students in real world activities

Involving students in active projects during the closing weeks of the school year is not only a productive use of the closing weeks, it’s also an opportunity to introduce students to Citizen Science and kindle a fire of enthusiasm they can follow up further over the summer holidays.  Citizen science  enables members of the public to participate in scientific research in collaboration with scientists and scientific organisations.  It’s open to individuals or groups and is easily accessible online.

In August, Kristin Fontichiaro of Michigan University, USA, introduced the concept to SLAV conference delegates in the course of exploring data literacy and the ways in which data permeates every aspect of our lives.  A partner in the 2 year project, Creating Data Literate Students,  Kristin introduced real world projects that could be brought into the classroom.

Potential Citizen Science projects (scientific and historical) are:

The Zooniverse is the world’s largest and most popular platform for people-powered research.  Involving hundreds of thousands of volunteer researchers worldwide, topics range from environmental projects, wildlife observation, climate, history and biology, just to name a few.

Weddell Seal Count (on Zooniverse) involves counting the number of Weddell seals in the Ross Sea area of Antarctica to establish if they are being threatened by fishing practices in the region.

SeaBirdWatch (on Zooniverse) aims to address the worldwide decline of seabirds.  Action is dependent on the gathering of huge about of data relating to birds, their location, flying patterns etc.  Identify and count birds from your computer at home.

BushBlitz Australia’s largest nature discovery project – a unique multi-million dollar partnership between the Australian Government through Parks Australia and the Australian Biological Resources StudyBHP Billiton Sustainable Communities and Earthwatch Australia to document plants and animals across Australia.  It’s in our backyard!

Measuring the ANZACs (on Zooniverse) is a New Zealand project transcribing the personnel files of individuals who served in World War I and the South African Wars.

Operation War Diary is another wartime historical project, this time of the British Army on the Western Front during World War I and involving analysis of 1.5 million pages of unit war diaries.

Atlas of Living Australia is a collaborative, national project that aggregates biodiversity data from multiple sources and makes it freely available and usable online.  Students can both contribute and  use data on the site to learn about the distribution of Australian flora and fauna.

Citizen science is becoming so popular and participation so easy, new projects are launching regularly.  For example the news article ‘Urgent rescue mission’ to save Australia’s frogs using smartphone app.  That app is FrogID, the tool being distributed to the public by the the Australian Museum to collect frog calls from across Australia.

As you consider embarking on a Citizen Science project for the classroom, some tips for consideration from Kristin and her colleagues.

  • How much training of volunteers is offered?
  • Has this project worked with high school students before?
  • Are there videos, online tutorials, and other teaching resources available?
  • What is the role of the lead scientists? Do they have an outreach or instructional team member who is available for questions or assistance?
  • Can you discern political or social perspectives, and are you comfortable discussing these?
  • Is there an obvious educational goal, or are objectives primarily related to “doing science” or service learning work?
  • How social is the team with its citizen scientists? Do they use Twitter, email newsletters, tagging within online platforms etc to communicate?
  • Are their communications and platforms compatible with your school’s policies?
    (Smith, Abilock, and Williams (in press))
As authentic assessment, rather than it being a simple observe and count exercise, Kristin and her team recommend:
  • Process journals/blogs
  • Reflective work
  • Oral presentation

This post has barely touched on the possibilities for involvement in Citizen Science, readers are welcome to share their experiences via Comments.  SLAV members check Kristin’s presentation on the SLAV member portal.

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Header adapted from image http://www.greeniacs.com/GreeniacsArticles/Education/Citizen-Science.html

SLAV Conference – Choose, Read, Succeed!

One hundred and seventy delegates enjoyed a brilliant series of contributions from the presenters at last week’s School Library Association of Victoria Conference, Choose, Read, Succeed: Partnerships of Practice, the last professional learning event for 2017.

From the amusing Opening Address by Australian Children’s Laureate Leigh Hobbs, through the Keynote Discussion on The visual narrative: story, illustration, message featuring Nicki Greenberg, Trace Balla and Van T Rudd, to a research report on Teen Reading in a Digital Age, presented by Deakin University academics Leonie Rutherford and Katya Johansen, the morning was both enlightening and entertaining.

Following lunch and the announcement of the SLAV Awards for 2017, the conference hosted the launch of the AFLW Inspire website with AFL Content Producer Tye Cattanach.

The Conference, which also featured morning and afternoon sessions of concurrent presentations (soon to be available in the Members’ area of the SLAV website), was rounded out by the State Library of Victoria’s Linda Angeloni, with Inside a Dog, revisited.

A highlight of the day was the annual award presentations acknowledging the achievements of inspirational and innovative school library leadership.  SLAV congratulates and thanks these energetic and passionate trailblazers.

2017 SLAV Awards

The inaugural SLAV Penny Geoghegan Award went to Reina Phung for her significant contribution to the governance, collegiality, network and learning community of the Association. The award is given in honour of SLAV’s former Vice-President and long-time Branch Representative who passed away prematurely in 2016.

The SLAV John Ward Award recipient for the year is Margaret Sinnott, in recognition of her “outstanding contribution to learning and teaching and raising the profile of the profession through her role as teacher-librarian”.

The SLAV Innovators Award, which acknowledges “the development of new and innovative practice in the school library”, went to two members – Michelle Nye in recognition of her work at Hillcrest Christian College, Clyde North, and Sue Dracoulas for her work at Nazareth College, Noble Park.

SLAV Research Fellowship for 2017 was given to Karys McEwen from Glen Eira College to support her research into “How school libraries in Victoria can best serve their young multilingual patrons”. The award carries a grant of $1,000.00.

And finally, the recipients of the SLAV School Leaders Award were Philip Grutzner, Principal, Leanne Guillon, Deputy Principal and David Dannock, Business Manager in recognition of their outstanding support of the school library and the work of the school library team at the Mellor Library, Carey Baptist Grammar School.

The Twitter stream from the Conference captured in this Storify indicates of the range and depth of topics covered on the day.

2017 Victorian Schools Games & Apps Challenge

With great excitement, the School Library Association of Victoria is proudly managing the delivery of the 2017 Victorian Schools Games & Apps Challenge. The Challenge is a Victorian Department of Education initiative with the support of Microsoft and is open to all Victorian Schools.  Aligning to the Victorian Curriculum and in particular, the Design and Technologies and Digital Technologies curriculum areas makes the Challenge an ideal curriculum enhancement project.

By providing opportunities to explore, experiment and tackle real world problems, the Challenge also directly supports STEM based learning and the Tech Schools initiative. It directs students’ focus outside the classroom walls as they seek to apply their inventive talents to every day problems.

With that in mind we ask – what is the problem, issue or challenge you want to take on? Could you create a game? How is your game or app going to increase awareness, provide strategies, create empathy or make things better? Who is your audience? Can you pitch your idea?

Using the Design Brief Template and other resources on the Victorian Schools Games & Apps Challenge website and supported by a range of tutorials and online support sessions, students will follow the design process to create a prototype of the Game/App.

Teachers will submit each group’s entry by 5 pm on Wednesday October 11.  Entries will be judged at Education in Games Summit as part of Melbourne International Games Week 22-29 October.

So, get a team together at your school and register them to compete. Who knows where it could lead?

Screen It 2017 – ACMI Competition

ACMI presents Screen It 2017, a national competition of school-aged filmmakers, animators and game developers.  To be in the running for the great prizes you’ll need to produce a live action film, animation or video game in response to the theme of ‘Time’.

Excellent resources are available to assist participants.  This can be a class activity or individual competition and is an opportunity for students to demonstrate their abilities.

Entries are due on Monday, 25 September 2017.  Winning entries will be exhibited online in the Australian Mediatheque.

 

ClassAct 50 Task Challenge for digital citizenship

The ClassAct 50 Task Challenge, a digital literacy challenge sponsored by the Office of the Children’s eSafety Commissioner.  ClassAct consists of 50 challenges that schools are encouraged to work through with students to develop a culture of respect and positive interaction in their online and offline worlds and to develop digital citizenship skills.  

How you and your school completes the Challenge is flexible.   The 50 tasks consist of a mix of quick, daily tasks designed to help children take control of their online safety, prompt thinking around respectful relationships and to know where to go to find support if things go wrong.

Each task relates to one or more of the categories:

  1. eSecurity—privacy, protecting personal information
  2. eSafety—managing screen-time, digital footprint, reputation
  3. Help and support
  4. Respect and relationships
  5. Cyberbullying

You may decide to commit to completing one task every day for a whole term, or perhaps to do one a week for a whole year… regardless of how you commit, the intention is to make digital intelligence part of your regular conversation with students to help increase digital safety, reduce negative behaviours like cyberbullying and to make time online as positive and enjoyable as possible.

At the school of the author of this blog, we’re presenting one challenge per school day via the student daily bulletin which is read in homeroom each morning.  The list of challenges are also being shared with parents via the school newsletter.  Not every challenge will appeal to every student but with the support of our student technology team, we’re promoting the ClassAct 50 Task Challenge across our school community, creating conversations and raising awareness.

To give you an idea of the content, here are the first 8 challenges (numbers at the end of each challenge reflect the categories above):

  1. Make a list of all the online accounts you have. Delete those you don’t use. (1,2)
  2. Choose one account that you have and update the password today. (1)
  3. Identify five trusted adults in your world who you would turn to if you had trouble online. (3,4)
  4. Kids Helpline offers webchat counselling. Check out their website to find out what hours it’s available. (3)
  5. Discuss: can you still be lonely if you have lots of friends online? (3, 4)
  6. Take the cyberbullying interactive quiz  (5)
  7. Where can Australian children under the age of 18 go to report cyberbullying? (3, 5)
  8. Research what two factor authentication is. Enable it on at least one of your social media accounts and/or emails. (1)

Plus 42 more….

The Challenge is recommended for students aged 10 – 14 years but is well suited to involving the whole family.

HINT:  I contacted enquiries@esafety.gov.au for an easy to manage .pdf of the 50 challenges.