Online resources

At this time there are many lists appearing that can help you find quality resources to support online learning in your school.  We look for institutions that we know produce reliable and authentic information, and have collated some of them here in this post for ease of access. We will continue to update this as we find new resources to share.

Our wonderful Melbourne Museums have all created online access portals:

Google has developed a comprehensive website providing resources and tools to assist teachers, parents and carers with teaching from home.

A FUSE learning from home page has been established to support school and early childhood leaders, teachers, students, children and parents access digital resources that can be used to support learning at home. Resources include sets of self-directed learning activities that can be provided to students in the form of a Word document or as a printed workbook, and activities parents can do with younger children.

Penguin Random House is permitting teachers, librarians and booksellers to create and share story time and read-aloud videos and live events.

Joyce Valenza is a highly respected commentator in the field of school librarianship. Last week she created a great blog post about learning from home.

The World Digital Library is curated by the Library of Congress in the USA. It includes almost 20,000 items from 193 countries.

The International Children’s Digital Library has over 4600 titles in 59 languages freely available.

Global Storybooks is a free multilingual literacy resource for children and youth worldwide.

Google Arts & Culture features content from over 1200 leading museums and archives who have partnered with the Google Cultural Institute to bring the world’s most famous museums and libraries into your home.

Open Culture brings together high-quality cultural & educational media for the worldwide lifelong learning community.

Audible have made their children’s platform freely available.

Allen & Unwin has a large range of Teachers’ Notes and Teachers’ Tips that are free to download and should provide you with invaluable ideas for teaching and facilitating engaging discussions of individual titles. Teaching resources can be accessed by clicking HERE.

On the Resources page, you will find tabs for Teachers’ Notes (Teachers’ Tips are available in this tab, too), Activities, Catalogues and other useful material. Materials are added according to the date of release of the book, hence more recent titles will be higher up than older. Simply scroll down to find what you are looking for. Alternatively, if you want to see if a particular title has resources available, just type the name of that title in the search bar on the Homepage or click HERE, go to the title’s product page and scroll to the bottom of the page.

Allen and Unwin Guidelines on Virtual Read-Alouds

Teachers or librarians wishing to create virtual read-alouds are permitted to do so at no charge within a closed platform for your use only, for non-commercial use only, and as long as the video is removed after a limited time (30 days) and you acknowledge the author and publisher, Allen & Unwin. Unfortunately, we cannot grant permission for these videos to be posted publicly to YouTube at this time. Please confirm this is agreeable by sending an email HERE with your email address, role, the book you will be reading, and what platform you plan to do the reading on.

Jacaranda have activated a special offer for schools providing remote learning, you can learn more HERE

The Australian Children’s Television Foundation have collated some fantastic resources HERE

CommonSense media also have a brilliant list HERE

ABC Education have some great resources for media literacy studies HERE

This curated list of resources is to assist you to ethically share children’s and young adult literature online.

Mo Willems invites you into his studio every day for his LUNCH DOODLE. Learners worldwide can draw, doodle and explore new ways of writing by visiting Mo’s studio virtually once a day for the next few weeks.

Please continue to share ideas of great sites via our various social media platforms.

Professional Learning Resource Round Up

As we all respond to the directives and guidelines in relation to COVID – 19 our association is working hard to ensure we are doing all we can to support our members.

With some schools needing to close for indefinite periods of time there may be a need for your school library staff to indicate ways they are exploring professional learning during a period of school closure or changed operations.

To assist, we have created this post, listing a range of professional learning opportunities made available to members.

A range of presentations from past Professional Learning Events can be accessed via the SLAV Member Login page HERE.

Over the past two years we have created podcasts of all of our Reading Forum events as well recording a selection of presentations given at our major conferences. These podcasts are available to anyone online and can be accessed HERE.

Synergy is our online, research based, journal. The most recent edition of the journal is closed to members only but all other editions of the journal are made freely available in light of the Associations interest in being collegiate and supportive of the wider professional community. We encourage you to explore the wealth of information from current and past editions HERE. 

Digital issues of our publication – FYI – can be accessed HERE. 

As a SLAV member, you also have access to resources from the International Association of School Librarianship through our partner membership status. There are some wonderful resources to be accessed on the IASL website and we encourage you to find time to explore them. Login details are available on our Member Login page.

Finally, a word on our 2020 Professional Learning Calendar. As we advised in our most recent newsletter we are doing all we can to ensure we are keeping our members and presenters safe, and are responding to guidelines and directives accordingly.

Events – cancellations and postponements

Our March 23 conference has been cancelled.

The IB workshop to be held in conjunction with DATTA Vic at Kardinia College on April 16 has been cancelled.

Our May Masterclass in conjunction with LMERC – Powering Learning: Supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives has been moved to September 4.

Our May 29 Conference – School Libraries: Powering Primary has been moved to September 14.

The National Education Summit on August 28 and 29 at MCEC, a strand of which we are a partner in providing, has been postponed to a later date yet to be announced.

All other Reading Forums, Workshops and Masterclasses

The remainder of our program are events that are to be held in school venues. At present we are continuing to plan and offer these events on the understanding that a decision will be made a month to two weeks out from each as to whether they are to go ahead. As it is very difficult to know exactly where we will be in two months’ time this approach is hopefully the best response in unknown times.

If you have any queries about this, please contact the SLAV office on 0477 439 593 or email slav@slav.org.au

We encourage all members to stay in touch with each other in these challenging times. Our branch structure is an excellent source of local support.  We encourage you to reach out and offer collegiate advice wherever you can and to ask if you need help or assistance. Our social media platforms can also be a source of connection. Please do reach out, we are open to assisting you in any way we can.

Reading forum series – podcast

The third of four SLAV Reading Forums planned for 2018 was held 6 September at Kew Primary School.

These events are proving to be very popular with school library staff, teachers and parents.  This month’s program featured a panel discussion on the topic of genrefication of the school library collection (particularly fiction) by local library professionals.  Authors David Metzenthen and Michael Wagner were feature authors on the evening and Kids Bookshop presented ‘Ten top books in ten minutes’.

If you missed the evening, or would like to recap, we’re pleased to advise the podcast of the event is now available for downloading on Soundcloud.  Previous forums are also available for download.

Further information on genrefication is available in the member’s portal of the SLAV website via conference presentations and articles in the journal FYI. The article Genre Labelling by Melanie Mengel is available on open access through SLAV’s professional publication Synergy.

The final Reading Forum for 2018 will be held:

Date:  1 November
Venue:  The Dream Factory, 90 Maribyrnong Street, Footscray
Topic: Current Reading Research

  • Recent reading research from here and overseas. Join the discussion and the
    end of year celebratory vibe
  • New books to share
  • Guest author
  • The Kids’ Bookshop in attendance
  • Register Online

 

 

 

SLAV Conference – Choose, Read, Succeed!

One hundred and seventy delegates enjoyed a brilliant series of contributions from the presenters at last week’s School Library Association of Victoria Conference, Choose, Read, Succeed: Partnerships of Practice, the last professional learning event for 2017.

From the amusing Opening Address by Australian Children’s Laureate Leigh Hobbs, through the Keynote Discussion on The visual narrative: story, illustration, message featuring Nicki Greenberg, Trace Balla and Van T Rudd, to a research report on Teen Reading in a Digital Age, presented by Deakin University academics Leonie Rutherford and Katya Johansen, the morning was both enlightening and entertaining.

Following lunch and the announcement of the SLAV Awards for 2017, the conference hosted the launch of the AFLW Inspire website with AFL Content Producer Tye Cattanach.

The Conference, which also featured morning and afternoon sessions of concurrent presentations (soon to be available in the Members’ area of the SLAV website), was rounded out by the State Library of Victoria’s Linda Angeloni, with Inside a Dog, revisited.

A highlight of the day was the annual award presentations acknowledging the achievements of inspirational and innovative school library leadership.  SLAV congratulates and thanks these energetic and passionate trailblazers.

2017 SLAV Awards

The inaugural SLAV Penny Geoghegan Award went to Reina Phung for her significant contribution to the governance, collegiality, network and learning community of the Association. The award is given in honour of SLAV’s former Vice-President and long-time Branch Representative who passed away prematurely in 2016.

The SLAV John Ward Award recipient for the year is Margaret Sinnott, in recognition of her “outstanding contribution to learning and teaching and raising the profile of the profession through her role as teacher-librarian”.

The SLAV Innovators Award, which acknowledges “the development of new and innovative practice in the school library”, went to two members – Michelle Nye in recognition of her work at Hillcrest Christian College, Clyde North, and Sue Dracoulas for her work at Nazareth College, Noble Park.

SLAV Research Fellowship for 2017 was given to Karys McEwen from Glen Eira College to support her research into “How school libraries in Victoria can best serve their young multilingual patrons”. The award carries a grant of $1,000.00.

And finally, the recipients of the SLAV School Leaders Award were Philip Grutzner, Principal, Leanne Guillon, Deputy Principal and David Dannock, Business Manager in recognition of their outstanding support of the school library and the work of the school library team at the Mellor Library, Carey Baptist Grammar School.

The Twitter stream from the Conference captured in this Storify indicates of the range and depth of topics covered on the day.

In collaboration – readers, stories, literacy

An partnership between School Library Association of Victoria and The Kids Bookshop has been formed to present a professional development program of workshops focussing on young readers, their reading habits and growth as readers.  Literacy is the key to success for all learners, influencing the way they see the world and the experiences they can share.

Readers,  Stories, Literacy – A forum for learning and discussion will offer news, views and strategies for motivating your readers with books and stories to provide positive literacy outcomes.   The five workshops, to be held between April and October 2017, will be presented by highly accredited children’s literature specialists and are designed to suit both primary and secondary educators and library staff.

Below is a summary of the workshops.  Full details are available at The Kids Bookshop

27 April (Primary) – Venue: Xavier College Library (Burke Hall)
New Books to share (The Kids’ Bookshop)
Literacy – with a focus on reading programs incorporating thinking skills and digital technologies in reading response (Dr Susan La Marca)
Guest author/Book Launch: Felice Arena, The Boy and the Spy

22 June (Secondary) – Venue: Melbourne High School Library
New Books to Share (The Kids’ Bookshop)
The Classroom Novel – tried, true and new plus resources to support taking a risk with your text selection (The Kids’ Bookshop)
Guest Author: Robert Newton, Mr Romonov’s Garden in the Sky

2 August (Primary) – Venue: Genazzano FCJ College Library
New books to Share (The Kids’ Bookshop)
Literacy – strategies to keep ALL children engaged with reading with a view to enhancing literacy achievement (Dr Pam McIntyre)
Guest author: Susannah McFarlane, The D-Bot Squad

21 September (Secondary) – Venue: Albert Park College Library
New books to Share (The Kids’ Bookshop)
Language – Yes, you can select novels rich with language and complex themes and enhance language development AND engage readers! (Laura Gordon)
Guest author: (TBC)

19 October (Primary/Secondary) – Venue: Abbotsford Convent Community Room
New Books to share (The Kids’ Bookshop)
Language and Literacy – the importance of non-fiction books in an online world (TBC)
Selecting books for awards and graduation (for both primary and secondary students) (The Kids’ Bookshop)
Guest authors: Carol Wilkinson, Ten Pound Pom PLUS two additional guests for our grand finale!

Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/z33be/6186670636

Engaging teen readers & Awarding success

SLAV wound up a busy year of professional learning for school library staff in 2016, with a vibrant Literature Conference- ‘Engaging Teen Readers’ featuring Will Kostakis, author of ‘Being Brave’.  Will spoke on difficult topics in literature and writing for adolescents and as you will see by the tweets in the embedded Storify, he was inspirational and insightful providing delegates with ideas to develop and inclusive approach reading for all students.

Held at the State Library of Victoria, the conference was an opportunity to focus on new and exciting ideas in the promotion of literacy and reading in the Victorian curriculum.  As always, it was a popular conference with 160 delegates attending.

SLAV appreciates the generosity of members to present their own successful practice to peers.  Workshops and presentations, which can be accessed on the member’s section of the SLAV website, include:

  • Capturing your reader – Will Kostakis
  • Book clubs and reading enrichment – Susan La Marca
  • Reading: the challenge and the competition- Reina Phung
  • Young Adult literature and programming in the US – Adele Walsh
  • When reading is hard – Chelsea Wright
  • The case for diversity in youth literature – Julie Purcell
  • Window to the real and online world – Joyce Sendeckyj
  • Reading programs for Years 7 & 9 – Hope Do
  • From A to Zine – Karys McEwen
  • Reading-unbound-a-book-club-journey – Sue Osborne
Check through the Storify for links, ideas and reflections shared throughout the day.
Read the contributions of Will and other presenters in the latest edition of SLAV’s FYI  and Synergy Journals on SLAV members’ page.

The November Conference is also an opportunity to recognise colleagues with awards presented for various levels of achievement.  We congratulate the following award recipients:

John Ward Award is presented for an individuals who have demonstrated an outstanding contribution to learning and teaching at their school and a raising of the profile of their profession through their role as teacher-librarian.

Awarded to: Miffy Farquharson
Miffy is well known within the SLAV Community and is a recognised Leader and Innovator. Not only is she involved in Information Technology, e-Learning and Web 2.0 Tools but also continues her passion for books and reading through her work at school and as a Volunteer for the Aurealis Award, the CBCA and Review Panellists of the Victorian Premier’s Reading Challenge.
Her personal motto is ‘I aim to put the right resource into the right hands at the right time, and provide appropriate resources to students and teachers using Library and Learning Management Systems, social networking and Web 2.0 tools’.  Congratulations Miffy.  Follow Miffy on Twitter @MiffyF02

School Leaders Award is presented to a school leader who demonstrates outstanding support of the school library and the work of the school library team.

Awarded to: Fran Reddan – Principal: Mentone Girls’ Grammar SchoolThrough her support and direction, Fran has enabled Kerferd Library to excel and meet the challenges of 21st Century learning and literacy support head on. She has allowed the Library to be innovative and take risks. At at time of increasing competition between schools Fran has allowed the Kerferd Library to share their learning with other school libraries.  Of strategic importance was Fran’s support as Principal along with the Senior Management Team and School Council Library, of the Library’s 3 year strategic plan,  giving the Library a road map to support the Curriculum, literacy and learning.

The partnership between Library staff and the Principal is critical for the success of the school library.  Congratulations David Feighan on your planning and vision as Head of Library.

Research Fellowship supports action research and evidence-based practice, taking the form of a $1000 grant to provide practical support to a teacher librarian to implement a local research project.

Awarded to: Julia Petricevic,  Teacher Librarian, Genazzano FCJ College, Kew.
Topic of Julia’s research is ‘The impact of the teacher librarian on developing interest and engagement with reading in Year 7 students’.  The purpose of this research project is to extend the library team’s understanding of our impact as a teacher librarian on the development of interest and engagement with reading in Year 7 students.

With the objectives:
To understand the reading habits and attitude towards reading of incoming students in Year 7.
To identify students in need of support, extension or motivation.
To evaluate the effectiveness of teaching strategies to foster interest and enjoyment of reading.

We look forward to hearing from Julia as she presents the outcome of her research in the future.

Truly an exceptional SLAV conference to close the year.

Reading for Pleasure – Book Week and more

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At this time of year the focus is on reading as we celebrate Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) Book Week.  It’s a time for author visits to schools, writing workshops, dressing up in favourite storybook characters – all with the purpose of developing a love of reading in our students.  In a world driven by technological developments that are changing the nature of future employment, the ability to read is an absolute necessity. The joy it brings is a bonus.

But how far do we go beyond dressing up and celebrating for this one week of the year?  How do we engage parents as key stakeholders in this process?  A movement in Sydney, Street Library Australia which is based on the US group Little Free Libraries aims to make reading front and centre by bringing it into family gardens.  Family involvement is key to a child’s success as a reader as its at home that habits are formed and established.

The National Library of New Zealand in their Services to Schools provide and excellent resource to support reading both at school and at home. Included on the site is Reading for Pleasure – a Door to Success where they advocate:

The benefits of reading for pleasure are far reaching. Aside from the sheer joy of exercising the imagination, evidence indicates reading for pleasure improves literacy, social skills, health and learning outcomes. It also gives people access to culture and heritage and empowers them to become active citizens, who can contribute to economic and social development.

This site tackles reading from all angles and brings a bounty of resources together in the one place. It well worth exploring in depth.  Every child is a reader – it’s not an option.

Slow Reading: the Power to Transform

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Reading programs and the support of a culture of reading is a common commitment in school libraries.  As teacher librarians, and librarians, we promote reading for enjoyment as a means of raising literacy levels through activities such as reading classes; engaging children in the Premiers’ Reading Challenge; running Book Clubs or supporting English teachers. To this end, the Synergy article Slow Reading: The Power to Transform by Dr Pam Macintyre, Senior Lecturer in Portfolio of Design and Social Context in the School of Education at RMIT is of particular interest.

In this article Pam says it’s logical to state, ‘greater understanding produces greater pleasure when reading’.  To fully understand and learn the skill of reading she encourages us to take time and to give students time, through a process of ‘slow reading’ saying:

Students need us to slow the reading, to model and facilitate the enjoyment of contemplation and the sharing of responses and interpretations. We need to share our enjoyment of language, and the delight in the places reading can take us well beyond the physical, geographical, emotional, intellectual boundaries of our daily lives. We also need to share our knowledge and pleasure about the how of what is said, not only the what.

Pam mentions the Australian research, the Children and Reading literature review which reports a 4% drop in the number of children reading for pleasure between 2003 and 2012.  As a passionate advocate of adolescent reading, she notes the opportunities for further research in this field as reading formats change from hard copy to digital.

In promoting a reading culture Pam quotes Terry Eagleton’s, How to Read Literature (2013)  and urges us to encourage in students a peculiarly vigilant type of reading, ‘one which is alert to tone, mood, pace, genre, syntax, grammar, texture, rhythm, narrative structure, punctuation, ambiguity’ (2013, p. 2).

This article, published in SLAV’s professional journal Synergy, provides teacher librarians and educators involved in raising literacy levels through a formal reading program, with a thoughtful approach to developing skilled readers.  Synergy is published bi-annually and is freely accessible online, apart from the two most recent editions.  It is a valuable source of research relating to school libraries.

Melbourne Mini Maker Faire in March

minimakerfaire1

A Mini Maker Faire is an event created by Make magazine to “celebrate arts, crafts, engineering, science projects and the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) mindset” (Wikipedia).  3D printing, arduino electronics, coding and Maker activities have come a long way in the three years since the first Melbourne Mini Maker Faire was held at Swinburne University in 2012.

Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) has entered the curriculum, the Hour of Code has been adopted worldwide and 3D printers have transitioned from being items of awe to common items in many schools, both primary and secondary.  These new tools are providing students with opportunities for hands-on application of science and technology as authentic tools for learning and Makerspaces in schools and libraries have become new spaces for learning.

It’s with great excitement, therefore, that we greet the announcement of 2016 Melbourne Mini Maker Faire!

Date: Saturday 19 March, 10am – 4pm

Location: KIOSC @ Swinburne University of Technology, 369 Stud Road, Wantirna 3152

Cost: Gold Coin Donation‌

The Victorian Department of Education and Training in association with the Knox Innovation Opportunity and Sustainability Centre (KIOSC) and Swinburne University of Technology are planning this exciting experience by providing a snapshot of what our future may look like.

The program will include: workshops by inventors and makers, demonstrations of cutting edge technologies, hands on activities for children and adults, nutritious food vendors and musical entertainment

Register as a Maker, Volunteer, Sponsor or an Attendee, today!
For information please visit the Melbourne Maker Faire website.

This video by Mat Bettinson of the 2012 Melbourne Mini Maker Faire provides you with an idea of what to expect at a Maker Faire.
Use these links to stimulate your imagination and begin an exploration of Maker Faires worldwide.

 

2014 SLAV Awards – acknowledging best practice

Success-cropped

Every year the School Library Association of Victoria Awards are presented in recognition of the contribution of members and school leaders, and to encourage research into best practice.  2014 award recipients were announced at the conference, Building Communities through Reading, held at the National Gallery of Victoria in November. That’s a couple of months ago, I know, but it’s not too late to acknowledge these professional achievements.

Four awards presented were:

  • The John Ward Award
  • School Leader’s Award
  • SLAV Innovator’s Grant
  • SLAV Research Fellowship

Teacher Librarian, Leonie Dyason of Mooroopna Secondary College is a worthy recipient of the John Ward Award, presented in recognition of outstanding commitment to school librarianship in Victoria and named in honour of founding member of the Association, John Ward.

During her time at Mooroopna (commencing in 1977) Leonie has worked to support a less advantaged community developing a high level of understanding of, and responding to particular learning needs by creating a targeted print and ICT-rich collection that is educationally and culturally appropriate. Leonie has been a staunch advocate for school libraries and has been an active member of the School Library Association of Victoria during her long career.

She has been a driving force and support for colleagues in the SLAV Goulburn Valley Branch since the 1980s serving on SLAV Committee of Management and other committees within the Association.  As a rural delegate, this has involved travelling from Mooroopna to Melbourne to attend meetings regularly. Commitment, dedication and collegiality have been a hallmark throughout Leonie’s teacher librarian career.
Congratulations Leonie!
____________

School Leaders are a critical component in the management and success of a school library.  2014 School Leader’s Award was presented to Marco DiCesare, Principal of Caroline Chisholm Catholic College, Braybrook and previously of Lavalla Catholic College, Traralgon. It was supported by commendations from Teacher Librarians, Barbara Roach (Caroline Chisholm Catholic College) and Jeananne Brown, (Lavalla Catholic College) both of whom have worked under the leadership of Marco.  Barbara and Jeananne and acknowledge that he possesses cutting edge understanding of the role of the Information Services sector of the educational community. This leadership is influenced by his deep understanding of how students learn which enables him to see the intrinsic value of school libraries.

Marco has encouraged innovation and looked for ways the school library can embrace learning opportunities. He encourages collaboration between the library and other departments and sums up his expectation for the role of the Teacher Librarian as:
Teacher Librarians support and implement the vision of the College through advocating and building effective library and information services and programs that contribute to the development of independent, interdisciplinary lifelong learners. The Teacher-Librarian partners and collaborates with teachers in the development of curriculum and pedagogy and manages the library and information resources and services of the school.”

Congratulations Marco.  The Principal is a key player in establishing the position of the school library within the school community.
____________

School libraries must be places of constant innovation and change responding to changing circumstances with new ways of working. Julie Purcell, Director Library Resource Centre at Ruyton Girls’ School and David Feighan, Information and Library Services Manager, Mentone Girls Grammar School were co-recipients of the SLAV Innovator’s Grant of 2014. The Grant was awarded in recognition of David and Julie’s work in initiating and setting up a shared ebook collection across two schools that are not under the same governing body nor in the same vicinity.

This project is innovative as it leads the way in inter school co-operation and enables both schools to offer larger, richer and more engaging ebook collections to their students.  It also demonstrates that two schools located some distance apart, with different library catalogue systems and no shared IT network, can still work effectively together. Well done!
____________

SLAV Research Fellowship for 2014 was awarded to teacher librarian, Amanda Baker, to allow her to further develop and extend the range of Reading Programs she has developed across Viewbank College, and which could serve as a model for other teacher librarians to follow.

Amanda’s presentation of her work to delegates at the conference was enthusiastically received. She illustrated that by working closely with English staff in the Middle Years, the Viewbank College Library has managed to build a thriving reading community. Activities such as the ‘Million Word Challenge’ and ‘The Reading Portfolio’ have increased student engagement, encouraged conversations about reading and increased involvement. In addition to supporting literacy outcomes, this reading model has strengthen the relationships between Teacher Librarian , the English faculty and other staff and supports a reading culture across the school.
Congratulations Amanda, we look forward to hearing more about your work.

Recognising exception practice within the profession is important. Whilst rewarding merit, it highlights exemplary practice and stimulates improvement. Watch out for the invitation to nominate candidates for 2015 awards later in the year.  Share the best practice that’s occurring within your school community.